Wednesday, August 29, 2012

A little information about why my diet is the way it is.

I have been thinking about this blog for a little while. Last week I wrote on my Facebook about not being able to do a total veggie and fruit diet. Many were confused why, and some even tried to tell me i could after a quick Google gave partial information. 

I have done extensive research on my conditions which prevent me from a total veggie diet. Although it was very difficult to find all the information on one page through the internet, I scoured and searched, asked doctors, dietitians, and any one else I could to give me all the information i needed and wanted. Yeah, I love researching stuff. Google and encyclopedia's are my best friends. 

I felt that this blog might help inform people about what it is to live the life of some one who has to take Coumadin, heparin, lovenox, Warfarin, or other blood thinning agents. So, here is what I, like so many others have to know, learn to moderate, and be wary of in everyday life. This list is what i have compiled together, linked with Factor 5 Leiden and lupus anticoagulant (although there is not much information on lupus anticoagulant yet). I usually want to keep my intake of vitamin k to around 80 mcg to 100 mcg.

First of all, what is Factor 5 Leiden and Lupus Anticoagulant?


Factor V Leiden is a blood clotting disorder. It is not a disease. 
Factor V is a protein that is needed for blood to clot properly. Some people do not 
have the normal Factor V protein. Instead, they have an different form called 
Factor V Leiden. This is caused by a change (mutation) in the gene for this protein. 
The different gene that makes the Factor V Leiden protein is inherited from one or 
both parents. 
The Factor V Leiden protein is harder to “turn off” than the normal Factor V protein. 
This makes blood clots more likely to form, a condition called thrombophilia.

Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against phospholipids (substances in the lining of cells) that prevent blood clotting in a test tube. Persons with these antibodies may have an abnormally high risk of blood clotting. According to most studies, greater than 50% of the people who have antiphospolipid antibodies, DO NOT have lupus. So, just because a person has the lupus anticoagulant antibodies does not necessarily mean that they have or will develop systemic lupus.





Low in Vitamin K

Now, I can have these in pretty normal amounts. I probably wont want to eat more then 2-3 servings of them in a day.

Green beans
Mushrooms
Carrots
Sauerkraut (canned)
Cauliflower
Onions
Celery
Green peppers
Corn
Pumpkin
Cucumber (peeled)
Potato
Egg plant
Tomato
Apples
Banana
Blueberries
Grapes
Oranges
Beef
Chicken
Pork
Tuna
Turkey
Corn oil
Peanut oil
Safflower oil
Sesame oil
Sunflower oil
Butter
Cheddar cheese
Eggs
Sour cream
Yogurt
Black tea
Cola
Fruit juices (except cranberry)
Milk

Medium Vitamin K amounts

These, I will want to eat about 1 serving a day, with maybe a small portion from the Low list.

Asparagus
Red Cabbage
Avocado
Green Peas
Pickles
Iceberg lettuce
Margarine
Olive oil

High in Vitamin K

I usually want to moderate closely. I can probably get away with eating ½  to a full serving with no other vitamin k intake for the day. I do have to keep consistent levels of intake of vitamin k in my system as to not throw my INR (InterNational Ratio) levels off.

Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Collard greens
Endive
Kale
Lettuce
Mustard greens
Parsley
Spinach
Turnip greens
Watercress
Swiss chard
Mayonnaise
Canola oil
Soybean oil
Green tea
Soybeans
Garbanzo beans
Beef liver

Things to avoid:
(but occasionally eat against my better judgment but eat in very small amounts, at most 1/2 a serving size.)

Cranberry products
Grapefruit
Tonka beans
Sweet clover
Co-enzyme Q10
Ginkgo biloba
Ginseng
St. Johns wort

*A serving is 1 cup raw, or 1/2 cooked. All portion sizes that I eat are what work within my normal INR range.  Work with your doctor or Coumadin clinic with incorporating these foods into your diet. Each person's diet and INR are unique and do not work for everyone.

Medications to avoid 
(unless directed by your doctor) 

Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. 
(Yeah, basically all over the counter pain killers.)

Supplements:

Co-enzyme Q-10, fish oil, ginkgo biloba, St. John's wort, ginseng and garlic, and vitamin E. Many health supplements can cause unintended interactions with Coumadin.

(This list of information is compiled from several sources, but is not intended to be used instead of advise from your individual doctor.)

1 comment:

  1. I have actually gotten a lot of notice on this blog entry! Featured on 12 websites from countries around the world, and have had 329 page views since it's published date. I hope this keeps going, and gets this information out there to people who need it. Thank you every one for reading!

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